X

You are using an unsupported browser. Please upgrade your version in order to view the pharmaprix.ca site.

What are my options for treating MS?

Featuring content from MediResource Inc.

If your doctor has recommended that you start treatment with a disease-modifying medication (a medication that can change the course of the disease) for MS, you have many options to choose from. The following disease-modifying medications are available in Canada.

Avonex® PS (interferon beta-1a)

This medication is used to treat the relapsing forms of MS. It is given once weekly into a muscle.

It is used to slow the progression of disability, decrease the frequency of relapses, and decrease the number and volume of active brain lesions (damage caused by MS) as shown on an MRI scan. It can also be used for people who have had a single attack, are at high risk of developing MS, and have and abnormal MRI scan - in this case it can reduce the risk of actually developing MS and also reduce the number and volume of active brain lesions.

This medication is also used to treat people with secondary progressive MS (who are still having relapses) to reduce decrease the frequency of relapses and decrease the brain lesions as shown on an MRI scan.

Betaseron® (interferon beta-1b)

This medication is given every other day as an injection under the skin. It is used to treat relapsing forms of MS (such as secondary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS).

For people with secondary progressive MS, it can slow the progression of disability and reduce the frequency of relapses. For people with relapsing-remitting MS, it can be used to reduce the frequency of relapses. It can also be used to reduce the risk of developing MS for people who have had a single MS attack, are at high risk of MS, and have an abnormal MRI scan.

Copaxone® (glatiramer acetate)

This medication is given once a day as an injection under the skin. It is used to treat relapsing-remitting MS.

For people with relapsing-remitting MS, it can reduce the frequency of relapses. It can also be used for people who have had a single attack and are at high risk of developing MS and have an abnormal MRI scan - in this case it can reduce the risk of actually developing MS and also reduce the number and volume of active brain lesions.

Extavia® (interferon beta-1b)

This medication is given every other day as an injection under the skin. It is used to treat relapsing forms of MS (such as secondary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS).

For people with secondary progressive MS, it can slow the progression of disability and reduce the frequency of relapses. For people with relapsing-remitting MS, it can be used to reduce the frequency of relapses. It can also be used to reduce the risk of developing MS for people who have had a single MS attack, are at high risk of MS, and have an abnormal MRI scan.

Gilenya® (fingolimod)

This medication is taken by mouth once a day. It is generally recommended for people who cannot take other MS treatments or for whom other MS treatments have not worked.

It is used for people with relapsing-remitting MS to reduce the frequency of relapses and slow the progression of physical disability.

Rebif® (interferon beta-1a)

This medication is given 3 times a week as an injection under the skin. It is used to treat relapsing forms of MS.

For people with relapsing-remitting MS, it can reduce the number and severity of relapses, slow the progression of physical disability, reduce the need for steroid medications, reduce the number of hospital visits for MS, and reduce the MS-related brain damage seen on an MRI scan. For those with secondary progressive MS, it can reduce the frequency of relapses and decrease MS-related brain damage as seen on an MRI scan.

Tysabri® (natalizumab)

This medication is given once every 4 weeks as an IV infusion. An IV infusion is a slow injection into a vein that is given in a clinic by a healthcare professional. It is used to treat relapsing-remitting MS.  It is generally recommended for people who cannot take other MS treatments or for whom other MS treatments have not worked.

For people with relapsing-remitting MS, it can reduce the frequency of relapses, delay the progression of physical disability, and reduce the number and volume of active brain lesions (areas damaged by MS) shown on an MRI scan.

You can use this information about MS treatment options as a starting point for your own research. To learn more about choosing a treatment, see "Which treatment for MS is right for me?" It's important to know that all treatments have both benefits and risks. Speak to your doctor for more information.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2020. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/healthfeature/gethealthfeature/MS-Deciding-on-Treatment